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The Effect of L-Arginine on the Growth of Heterotrophic Cultures of the Emerson Strain of Chlorella. I. Effects on Cell Growth, Cell Division Chloroplast Development and Nucleic Acid Synthesis

L. V. Thinh and D. J. Griffiths
The New Phytologist
Vol. 73, No. 6 (Nov., 1974), pp. 1087-1095
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2431267
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of L-Arginine on the Growth of Heterotrophic Cultures of the Emerson Strain of Chlorella. I. Effects on Cell Growth, Cell Division Chloroplast Development and Nucleic Acid Synthesis
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Abstract

Cells of the Emerson strain of Chlorella grown heterotrophically on a glucose medium in darkness, do not divide normally but grow in volume well beyond their normal maximum size to give 'giant' cells. The delay in the onset of cell division is much reduced if L-arginine (2 x 10-3 M) is included in the medium. In the presence of arginine the cells reach their maximum 'giant' dimension sooner and then divide to produce twenty to thirty autospores-the usual number for 'giant' cells. Arginine-stimulated autospore production is preceded by chloroplast development, by an increased rate of endogenous respiration and by nucleic acid synthesis. The arginine effect is observed only if nitrate is also supplied. The arginine effect is compared with the previously reported light-stimulated recovery of chloroplast development and autospore production in 'giant' cells of this strain and its significance is discussed in relation to the probable involvement of arginine in the mechanism controlling the onset of cell division.

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