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Nitrogen Sources and 'A' Values for Vesicular-Arbuscular and Non-Mycorrhizal Sorghum Grown at Three Rates of 15N-Ammonium Sulphate

R. N. Ames, Lynn K. Porter, T. V. St. John and C. P. Patrick Reid
The New Phytologist
Vol. 97, No. 2 (Jun., 1984), pp. 269-276
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2432307
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Nitrogen Sources and 'A' Values for Vesicular-Arbuscular and Non-Mycorrhizal Sorghum Grown at Three Rates of 15N-Ammonium Sulphate
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Abstract

Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] plants were grown in soil treated with one of three rates of (15NH4)2SO4 fertilizer. Mycorrhizal plants did not significantly differ from non-mycorrhizal plants in total plant dry weight, total plant N, or percent utilization of the applied N by the whole plant at any fertilizer rate. However, the atom percent 15N excess in shoots, roots and the whole plant, and percent N derived from fertilizer were significantly higher for non-mycorrhizal plants at the intermediate level of ferilizer N. The percent N derived from native soil sources, and 'A' values were significantly higher for mycorrhizal plants, compared to non-mycorrhizal plants, at the intermediate but not low or high fertilizer rates. The results suggest that, at the intermediate fertilizer rate, where plants produced the most growth, mycorrhizal sorghum plants derived N from a source that was less available to non-mycorrhizal plants.

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