Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Timing of Division in Chlamydomonas

Mary McAteer, Lorraine Donnan and Peter C. L. John
The New Phytologist
Vol. 99, No. 1 (Jan., 1985), pp. 41-56
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2432515
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Timing of Division in Chlamydomonas
Preview not available

Abstract

The duration of the cell cycle of Chlamydomonas is determined by two timed periods which each follow an initiating stimulus. A commitment timer, initiated by the beginning of growth in autonomous daughter cells, is dependent upon concurrent growth and controls the time of first commitment to divide. Division processes, which are then initiated, occupy a second timer period of 6 h duration at 25 ⚬C. Absence of division control by an endogenous oscillator was indicated by an unfluctuating ability to resume cycles of consistent duration when daughter cells were held in darkness or when growing cells in light were subjected to darkness. A consistent time from the beginning of daughter growth to commitment was also observed when daughter formation was delayed by an earlier temperature reduction. Ethanol, which commonly affects circadian oscillators, did not disturb synchrony The division cycle is controlled by growth and not by direct response to light, since commitments ceased when growth was prevented by lack of CO2 in the light. Growth in daughter cells initiated the timer leading to commitment since commitment was reached at similar times after resupply of CO2 or reillumination. Division synchrony in diurnal cycles of periodic illumination is not caused by entrainment of an oscillator but by the growth requirement of the hourglass timer leading to commitment. A model of division control is presented.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56