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Ad. "Lĕšonénu" 64, pp. 221–230 / קשיים בסרטוט עקומת ההטעמה העברית: למאמרו של מ' פלורנטין, "עקומת ההטעמה העברית והנלמד ממנה ומעברית השומרונים על הטעמת לשון המשנה", לשוננו סד (תשס"ב), עמ' 221-230

גבריאל בירנבאום and Gabriel Birnbaum
Lĕšonénu: A Journal for the Study of the Hebrew Language and Cognate Subjects / לשוננו: כתב-עת לחקר הלשון העברית והתחומים הסמוכים לה
Vol. סה‎, No. ב‎ (אדר ב' התשס"ג), pp. 183-187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24331231
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ad. "Lĕšonénu" 64, pp. 221–230 / קשיים בסרטוט עקומת ההטעמה העברית: למאמרו של מ' פלורנטין, "עקומת ההטעמה העברית והנלמד ממנה ומעברית השומרונים על הטעמת לשון המשנה", לשוננו סד (תשס"ב), עמ' 221-230
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Abstract

There are two shortcomings in Moshe Florentin's article. One is methodological: the author's presupposition that the stress system reflected in the Tiberian masoretic vocalization and cantillation is identical with that of pre-exilic biblical Hebrew is unwarranted. Early and recent scholarship alike has demonstrated the gap between pre-exilic and Tiberian masoretic Hebrew, which does not predate the sixth or seventh century C.E. Whoever wishes to argue, nevertheless, that the Tiberian stress system does reflect a very early historical stratum of Hebrew must buttress this claim. The second flaw lies in the author's disregard for the scholarly view, propounded inter alia by G. Bergsträsser and A. Dotan, that the general shift to the ultima took place at a very late stage in the history of Hebrew, perhaps even after it had ceased to function as a spoken language. I find this latter approach more plausible. I do concur, however, with the author's contention that Mishnaic Hebrew had a penult stress system.

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