Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Sexual Strategies in Plants. I. An Hypothesis of Serial Adjustment of Maternal Investment During One Reproductive Session

David G. Lloyd
The New Phytologist
Vol. 86, No. 1 (Sep., 1980), pp. 69-79
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2434416
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Sexual Strategies in Plants. I. An Hypothesis of Serial Adjustment of Maternal Investment During One Reproductive Session
Preview not available

Abstract

It is postulated that in one reproductive session the level of maternal expenditure of an angiosperm plant is determined by a temporal series of controls on the number of potential fruit in which an investment is made. The serial adjustment hypothesis has three parts: A. The amount of maternal expenditure is regulated at many developmental units, particularly single flowers and fruit, at three principal sequential stages- the determination of flowers, the development of ovaries and the maturation of fruit. B. At each stage, the initiation or continuation of an investment requires an amount of available resources above a certain threshold. Hence maternal expenditure is continually adjusted to the resources available at each developmental site. C. The pattern of controls that maximizes the maternal fitness of a plant is selected. Many factors affect the relative advantages of regulation at the three stages, therefore species and sexual morphs appear to vary widely in their proportional use of the three stages. Regulation of flower determination has the general advantages of offering bidirectional adjustment of maternal investment, maintaining a constant ratio of maternal to paternal investment, and reducing wasted expenditure. The later stages, ovary and fruit regulation, allow secondary adjustments of maternal investment in unpredictable circumstances and permit adjustment of the relative numbers of polliniferous and seminiferous flowers. The relative advantages of restricting the numbers of developing ovaries, or of maturing fruit, depend principally on the extent to which differences in the capacity of flowers to mature fruit are evident before anthesis.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79