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Intuitions and the Value of a Person

JOHN HALDANE
Journal of Applied Philosophy
Vol. 14, No. 1 (1997), pp. 83-86
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24354154
Page Count: 4
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Intuitions and the Value of a Person
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Abstract

In contemporary moral theory and normative ethics there is frequent recourse to 'intuitions' of value. One current instance of this is the appeal in reproductive and population ethics to the thought that the existence of a human being is not as such good or bad. Here the status and substance of this assumption are challenged. In addition, doubt is cast on the value of appeals to intuition where these are not related to some philosophical account of the grounds of value.

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