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Review: THREE BOOKS ON HEBREW IN THREE COUNTRIES / שלושה ספרי בלשנות בשלוש ארצות

Reviewed Works: The Emergence of Hebrew Biblical Pointing, The Indirect Sources by Bruno Chiesa; La escuela hebrea de Cordoba by Carlos del Valle Rodriguez; Diplomatic Hebrew, a Glossary of Current Terminology; Biblical and Judaic Acronyms by Lawrence (Elazar) Marwick
Review by: נחמיה אלוני , Nehemya Allony
Lĕšonénu: A Journal for the Study of the Hebrew Language and Cognate Subjects / לשוננו: כתב-עת לחקר הלשון העברית והתחומים הסמוכים לה
Vol. מה‎, No. ג/ד‎ (ניסן-תמוז ה'תשמ"א), pp. 299-306
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24359176
Page Count: 8
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THREE BOOKS ON HEBREW IN THREE COUNTRIES / שלושה ספרי בלשנות בשלוש ארצות
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Abstract

The book is an offspring of his thesis, L'antico Testamento Ebraico secondo la tradizione palestinense. The author gives too much credit to the Karaites for the emergence of the vocalization systems, since he believes the vocalization emerged after the arrival of the Karaites in Eretz Israel. The author mentions three systems of vocalization only and not four. According to him, the Rabbanites opposed vocalization, since it limits the means of commentating the Bible. This book deals with the same subject as W. Bacher's Die Anfang der hebraischen Grammatik and, especially, David Yelin's Toldot Hitpatḥut ha-Diqduq ha-'Ivri. The only one not belonging to this school is Yehuda ibn-Quraish. The lack of indices is noticeable. The author served as the Head of the Hebrew section of the Library of Congress in Washington, where government officials used to ask about the meanings of modern Hebrew words found in diplomatic documents. This book is thus the result of the needs of the diplomatic circles of the United States Government.

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