Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Selbstbestimmung und Selbstentzogenheit: Luther zum "sensus proprius"

Thomas Wabel
Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte
Vol. 45 (2003), pp. 83-120
Published by: Felix Meiner Verlag GmbH
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24361513
Page Count: 38
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Selbstbestimmung und Selbstentzogenheit: Luther zum "sensus proprius"
Preview not available

Abstract

A well-known rule of exegesis holds that the Holy Scriptures must not be interpreted eisegetically, according to the interpreter's own spirit (spiritus proprius or sensus proprius) but according to the spirit in which they are written. Luther quotes this rule in his Assertio omnium articulorum (1521) and develops it further to become the scriptural principle by which Protestantism identifies itself (sola scriptura). In this paper, the origins of the denial of sensus proprius shall be pointed out (the fight against heresy and deviation from the church's authority, the concept of humility in the monastic tradition, denial of the self in mysticism). Thus, the changes that this concept underwent within the development of Luther's criticism will become clear. He radicalizes the denial of sensus proprius in such a way as to incorporate the exclusion of every conceivable human merit towards salvation, thereby producing the dialectical dynamic of sensus proprius being found exactly within the effort to avoid it.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[83]
    [83]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120