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Journal Article

The Floral Anatomy of the Aurantioideae

Albert H. Tillson and Ronald Bamford
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 25, No. 10 (Dec., 1938), pp. 780-793
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2436606
Page Count: 14

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Topics: Petals, Calyx, Stamens, Carpels, Ovaries, Flower stigma, Sex glands, Genera, Canals, Anatomy
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The Floral Anatomy of the Aurantioideae
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Abstract

An anatomical study of 94 species comprising 29 genera of the Aurantioideae suggests the following: In the tribe Clauseneae the sepal and petal midribs arise independently from the axis, while in the Citreae, except for Afraegle, Aeglopsis, and Aegle, the sepal midribs are fused to the lateral petal bundles. However, the vascular system does not offer so definite a basis for the division of the tribes and subtribes. The fusion of the sepal midrib and lateral petal bundles in Pleiospermium, Hesperethusa, Luvunga, Triphasia, Wenzelia, and Atalantia demonstrates their closcr affinity to the Citrinae than to the Clauseneae. Unusually large oil glands are often present at the tips of the sepals, disc, ovary, stigma, or stamens and are usually in close association with vascular tissue. The possibility that pleiomery of the stamens arises from the division of either antesepalous stamens or both antesepalous and antepetalous stamens is indicated by branching of their traces. The dise, which may be a swollen axis, stalk-like, ring-shaped to cup-like, or absent, appears to represent a third whorl of vestigial stamens. The uninterrupted alternation of all the whorls is obtained, and the antepetalous position of the carpels of isomerous ovaries is explained, if the above interpretation of the nature of the disc is accepted. The stylar canals consist of narrow slits surrounded by epidermal cells and are continuous from the papillose stigmatic cells to the conducting hairs between the placentae. They are not modified ventral carpel bundles.

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