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Passage of Air Through Plants and its Relation to Measurement of Respiration and Assimilation

Violette F. C-Glasstone
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 29, No. 2 (Feb., 1942), pp. 156-159
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2437444
Page Count: 4
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Passage of Air Through Plants and its Relation to Measurement of Respiration and Assimilation
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Abstract

Seventeen species of plants were examined and found to permit the passage of air through their tissues both in the direction of leaf to root and root to leaf. There was an approximate proportionality between the amount of air passing and the applied pressure; and the results were reproducible. It was noted that age, size, and moisture condition of the plant were factors which appeared to affect the rate of passage. It is suggested that, while individual and specific differences occurred in ability to allow air to pass through tissues, those differences are believed to be matters of degree. The rapid passage of air through plants was demonstrated in connection with the measurement of carbon dioxide produced in respiration.

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