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Arachis hypogaea. Seedling Growth Rate

John A. Yarbrough
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 37, No. 10 (Dec., 1950), pp. 779-785
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2437755
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Arachis hypogaea. Seedling Growth Rate
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Abstract

Virginia bunch peanut seedlings, germinated and grown under favorable conditions, showed no growth lag up to the appearance of flowers. Appearance of expanded leaves, stem length, root length and dry weights of roots and shoots, shown as functions of age, describe curves which represent a period of rapid and relatively uniform growth. These curves show only an early fraction of the entire growth process of the shoot of the plant. Root elongation proceeds very rapidly, gaining decidedly over the hypocotyl in the early days of germination. Secondary roots do not appear before the fifth day but within 10 days are numerous and in that time may reach 166 mm. in length. The hypocotyl undergoes a loss in dry weight parallelling in time a similar loss in the cotyledons. The hypocotyl later makes gains in dry weight as its secondary growth is initiated. Relatively low temperatures, even for a few days, may produce a slight lag in growth of the shoot. Thrips attacking plants during the pre-flowering period may also retard shoot growth. Young seedling leaves may be seriously injured by insects. Applied repeatedly, 5 per cent DDT dust gave excellent control.

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