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Growth and Morphogenesis of the Strawberry as Related to Auxin

J. P. Nitsch
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 37, No. 3 (Mar., 1950), pp. 211-215
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2437903
Page Count: 5
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Growth and Morphogenesis of the Strawberry as Related to Auxin
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Abstract

The action of the achenes upon the growth of the strawberry has been studied. Total removal of the achenes completely stops further growth of the fleshy part. Partial removal of the achenes results in fruits of abnormal shape because only the parts of the receptacle adjacent to the remaining achenes continue to grow. Only fertilized achenes are active. The weight of the fleshy part of a strawberry is a function of the number of developed achenes. The fertilized achenes can be replaced by synthetic growth substances in their action upon the growth of the receptacle. Beta-naphthoxyacetic acid and beta-indolebutyric acid in lanolin paste have induced strawberries of normal shape and size in the absence of achenes. The achenes have been found to contain relatively large amounts of free auxin, in contrast to the receptacles which did not yield any free auxin. The concentration of auxin in the achenes varies greatly with the stage of development. Free auxin fluctuations in the developing strawberry ovules are similar to those encountered in corn and rye kernels.

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