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The Isolation, Purification, and Culture of Blue-Green Algae

Gerald C. Gerloff, George P. Fitzgerald and Folke Skoog
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 37, No. 3 (Mar., 1950), pp. 216-218
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2437904
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Isolation, Purification, and Culture of Blue-Green Algae
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Abstract

As a first step in the study of the nutrition and physiology of blue-green algae, the organisms have been isolated as uni-algal, bacteria-free cultures which can be grown and studied in the laboratory under carefully controlled conditions. The common microbiological techniques of isolation by streaking or pouring agar plates proved to be unsatisfactory methods of separating blue-green algae from contaminating greens and diatoms. Single cells and filaments isolated with a micromanipulator also failed to grow. However, twenty species, including the common bloom-producers Aphanizomenon flosaquae and Diplocystis aeruginosa, have been obtained by starting with a heavy suspension of algae in lake water and subculturing portions of this suspension in Chu No. 10 solution. By repeated selection and subculturing of the least contaminated cultures, each species was eventually separated from contaminants other than bacteria. Ten of the uni-algal cultures isolated by this procedure have been freed of bacteria by ultra-violet irradiation followed by repeated sub-culturing. Chu No. 10 nutrient solution has been modified to provide an organic iron source, ferric citrate-citric acid, in place of the ferric chloride specified by Chu and found to be a successful culture medium for twenty-two species of blue-green algae that have been grown through repeated transfers during the past year.

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