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Journal Article

American Indian Adult Education And Literacy: The First National Survey

Rodney L. Brod and John M. McQuiston
Journal of American Indian Education
Vol. 22, No. 2 (JANUARY, 1983), pp. 1-16
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24397081
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
American Indian Adult Education And Literacy: The First National Survey
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Abstract

The National Indian Management Service of America, Inc. (NIMS) a nonprofit, Indian owned and controlled consulting firm was funded over a three year period (1977-1980) by the United States Office of Education/Office of Indian Education (USOE/OIE) to conduct the first national study identifying and accurately describing the extent of problems of illiteracy and the lack of high school completion among adult American Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos.* To achieve a national sample representative of American Indian adults, the research included data derived from cluster samples of counties (census districts in Alaska and Hawaii) throughout the United States. Structured interviews were designed to provide information on the functional literacy, educational attainment, and social indicators of adult Indians and to describe federal and state supported programs providing adult education services. The results of this study have important implications for the future of Indian education: for the first time in history, a national data base accurately assessing the functional literacy, educational attainment and expressed needs of American Indian adults can assist educators, legislators, tribal decision-makers and others in their efforts toward better educational quality, Indian self-determination, and to achieve the goals, purposes, and funding levels necessary to enhance the educational programs of all Indians, Aleuts and Eskimos of this nation.

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