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Stem Anatomy and Aspects of Development in Tomato

Neal P. Thompson and Charles Heimsch
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 51, No. 1 (Jan., 1964), pp. 7-19
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2440057
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Stem Anatomy and Aspects of Development in Tomato
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Abstract

Aspects of anatomical development were correlated with internodal growth in tomato plants, variety `Yellow Plum,' grown for more than 3 months. Internodal length was measured weekly in control plants and those harvested for anatomical study. Gross structure indicated progressive development with increasing age. Primary xylem and phloem first mature in distinct strands and the strands are joined laterally by procambium to form a continuous vascular cylinder. Primary phloem occurs on the outer periphery of the procambium between the early-formed vascular strands. Successive periclinal divisions in the procambium during internode elongation give rise to pronounced radial seriations of the cells. Procambial derivatives are included in the cylinder of thick-walled, lignified vascular cells that become prominent after elongation ceases. Secondary xylem is of greater radial width in the stem sectors which include protoxylem. During early secondary growth, vessels develop in the secondary xylem only in these sectors. Nucleate fibers and rays constitute the remainder of the secondary xylem. The rays exhibit an organization noted in other plants of reduced growth habit. Some of these interpretations do not agree with those described for tomato in earlier studies, and they are discussed in relation to pertinent aspects of development.

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