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The Role of Populational Differentiation in Experimental Infection of Prosopis by Phoradendron

David S. May
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 58, No. 10 (Nov. - Dec., 1971), pp. 921-931
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2441258
Page Count: 11
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The Role of Populational Differentiation in Experimental Infection of Prosopis by Phoradendron
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Abstract

Experimental infection of Prosopis species with the mistletoe Phoradendron tomentosum subsp. tomentosum in a uniform garden demonstrated that differences in infection success between species, populations, and individuals can be caused by genetically-based differences in both hosts and parasites. Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa was least resistant to infection; P. laevigata was more resistant; and P. torreyana was most resistant. A population of P. glandulosa var. glandulosa grown from seeds collected in the lower Rio Grande valley was significantly more resistant to infection than three populations of the same variety from central and northern Texas. The higher resistance of the Rio Grande valley population appears to be due to introgression with P. laevigata. The experimental population of Phoradendron tomentosum subsp. tomentosum from northeastern Mexico and the population of the same subspecies from southern Texas had greater infectivity than did those from central and northern Texas, corresponding to the greater resistance of the southern Prosopis populations.

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