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Leaf-Opposed Buds in Musa: Their Development and a Comparison with Allied Monocotyledons

Jack B. Fisher
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 65, No. 7 (Aug., 1978), pp. 784-791
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442154
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Leaf-Opposed Buds in Musa: Their Development and a Comparison with Allied Monocotyledons
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Abstract

A single, lateral, vegetative bud which is positioned 180⚬ from the axil of a leaf is a generic feature of Musa (Musaceae). Such leaf-opposed buds occur in all ten species and five cultivars examined, representing all four sections of the genus and all groups of cultivated bananas and plantains. The bud arises relatively late and is first visible as a vascular-free "clear zone" in the axis directly below the future bud meristem site. It is first associated with the fifth or sixth leaf primordium from the apex. A defined superficial meristem develops on the stem directly above the insertion of the leaf margins one or more plastochrons later. Normal, basically axillary, vegetative buds occur in the closely related genera: Orchidantha (Lowiaceae), Heliconia (Heliconiaceae), Strelitzia, and Ravenala (Strelitziaceae). These buds arise in the axil of the first to the third leaf primordium in a manner similar to most other monocotyledons. Axillary vegetative buds also occur in the remaining families of the Zingiberales: Cannaceae, Costaceae, Marantaceae, and Zingiberaceae

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