Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Developmental Anatomy and Ultrastructure of the Ant-Food Bodies (Beccariian Bodies) of Macaranga triloba and M. hypoleuca (Euphorbiaceae)

Fred R. Rickson
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 67, No. 3 (Mar., 1980), pp. 285-292
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442338
Page Count: 8

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Lipids, Plant cells, Lipid bodies, Plants, Ants, Starches, Body tissues, Cell walls, Daughter cells, Cytoplasm
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Developmental Anatomy and Ultrastructure of the Ant-Food Bodies (Beccariian Bodies) of Macaranga triloba and M. hypoleuca (Euphorbiaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Macaranga is a common secondary growth tree of S.E. Asia. Nine species possess hollow stems which harbor an ant colony, and also produce food bodies which are eaten by the ants. In return, the ants protect the plant from herbivore damage. The multicellular food bodies of M. triloba (Bl.) Muell. Arg. are developed on the underside of down-turned clasping stipules, while in M. hypoleuca (Reichb. f. and Zoll.) Muell. Arg. they are produced on the abaxial surface of young leaves. Food body cells of both species are very rich in lipid, contain large starch grains, and possess an electron-dense hyaloplasm. It is proposed to name the Macaranga ant-food bodies Beccariian bodies in honor of the Italian botanist Odoardo Beccari who explored S.E. Asia in the late 1800s.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
286
    286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
287
    287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292