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Vegetation and Floral Colors Revealed by Ultraviolet Light: Interpretational Difficulties for Functional Significance

Peter G. Kevan
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 66, No. 6 (Jul., 1979), pp. 749-751
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442421
Page Count: 3
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Vegetation and Floral Colors Revealed by Ultraviolet Light: Interpretational Difficulties for Functional Significance
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Abstract

The importance of measuring floral colors as insects might see them is often ignored. Ultraviolet, only one of the wavebands visible to insects, is often recorded in vacuo, without reference to the insect visual spectrum, without quantification, and without reference to background coloration and ambient lighting. Such oversights may lead to serious errors in interpreting the functional significance of floral colors and color patterns.

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