Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Role of Endomycorrhizae in Revegetation Practices in the Semi-Arid West. I. A Comparison of Incidence of Mycorrhizae in Severely Disturbed Vs. Natural Environments

F. Brent Reeves, David Wagner, Thomas Moorman and Jean Kiel
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 66, No. 1 (Jan., 1979), pp. 6-13
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442618
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available

Abstract

A comparison of a natural, undisturbed ecosystem, a mid-elevation sage community, with a severely disturbed old roadbed through this community revealed that more than 99% of the plant cover in the natural community was mycorrhizal (vesicular-arbuscular), whereas less than 1% of the plant cover in the disturbed area (roadbed) was mycorrhizal. Examples of nonmycorrhizal plants as primary successional species in severely disturbed habitats are discussed. The importance of maintaining or re-establishing the mycorrhizal fungal component in reclamation programs designed to produce stable ecosystems is emphasized.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13