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Journal Article

The Role of Endomycorrhizae in Revegetation Practices in the Semi-Arid West. II. A Bioassay to Determine the Effect of Land Disturbance on Endomycorrhizal Populations

Thomas Moorman and F. Brent Reeves
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 66, No. 1 (Jan., 1979), pp. 14-18
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442619
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Role of Endomycorrhizae in Revegetation Practices in the Semi-Arid West. II. A Bioassay to Determine the Effect of Land Disturbance on Endomycorrhizal Populations
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Abstract

Populations of the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus fasciculatus were significantly reduced following land disturbance in western Colorado soil. A bioassay was developed to measure changes in the endomycorrhizal population. In the bioassay, inoculum levels were measured by comparing the percentage infection in corn (Zea mays) root systems thirty days after planting in undisturbed or disturbed soils. The percentage infection was 2% in the disturbed soil compared to 77% in the adjacent undisturbed soil. Glomus fasciculatus was identified as the endophyte in both soils. Considering the importance and function of endomycorrhizal fungi to their plant hosts the reduction of active inoculum in the disturbed soil may be an important ecological factor in subsequent succession.

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