Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Dynamics of Gene Flow in an Experimental Population of Cucumis melo (Cucurbitaceae)

Steven N. Handel
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 69, No. 10 (Nov. - Dec., 1982), pp. 1538-1546
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2442907
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Dynamics of Gene Flow in an Experimental Population of Cucumis melo (Cucurbitaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Gene flow in an experimental garden of Cucumis melo (Cucurbitaceae), the cultivated muskmelon, was measured by placing plants carrying a dominant gene (green cotyledons) in the center of an 18 x 18-m field of recessive plants (yellow cotyledons). At the end of the growing season, all fruits were collected, and seeds planted for analysis of the progeny. The 123 fruits yielded 41,875 seedlings whose genotypes were recorded. Gene flow decreased with increasing distance from the central plot, while the variance increased. The decrease in frequency of the green gene did not follow a leptokurtic pattern over the distance measured, and there was a marked asymmetric and patchy pattern of gene flow in the field. The directionality contributed to a bimodal pattern of gene frequencies among fruits at the edges of the field, some fruits with no green seedlings, some with many. Bumblebee movements were recorded during 4,296 flower visits in an identically arrayed melon field. Bees usually moved to very nearby plants and visited only a few flowers on any one plant. This suggests that pollen carryover from the central patch out was quite high in the test garden. These findings show that local gene flow patterns in plant populations may be complex, and do not always follow regular and symmetrical models. The complex arrangement of progeny genotypes, when acted upon by local selective forces, may contribute to small-scale differences often seen in plant populations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1538
    1538
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1539
    1539
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1540
    1540
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1541
    1541
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1542
    1542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1543
    1543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1544
    1544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1545
    1545
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1546
    1546