Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Light, Temperature and Salinity Effects on Growth, Leaf Anatomy and Photosyntesis of Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene

Paul R. Kemp and Gary L. Cunningham
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 68, No. 4 (Apr., 1981), pp. 507-516
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2443026
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Light, Temperature and Salinity Effects on Growth, Leaf Anatomy and Photosyntesis of Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of light, temperature, and salinity on growth, net CO2 exchange and leaf anatomy of Distichlis spicata were investigated in controlled environment chambers When plants were grown at low light, growth rates were significantly reduced by high substrate salinity or low temperature. However, when plants were grown at high light, growth rates were not significantly affected by temperature or salinity. The capacity for high light to overcome depressed growth at high salinity cannot be explained completely by rates of net photosynthesis, since high salinity caused decreases in net photosynthesis at all environmental conditions. This salinity-induced decrease in net photosynthesis was caused largely by stomatal closure, although plants grown at low temperature and low light showed significant increases in internal leaf resistance to CO2 exchange. Increased salinity resulted in generally thicker leaves with lower stomatal density but no significant differences in the ratio of mesophyll cell surface area to leaf area. Salinity and light during growth did not significantly affect rates of dark respiration. The mechanisms by which Distichlis spicata tolerates salt appear to be closely coulpled to the utilization of light energy. Salt-induced leaf succulence is of questionable importance to gas exchange at high salinity in this C4 species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516