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Colonization and Establishment of Missouri Prairie Plants on Artificial Soil Disturbances. II. Detecting Small-Scale Plant-to-Plant Interactions and Separating Disturbance from Resource Provision

Deborah Rabinowitz and Jody K. Rapp
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 72, No. 10 (Oct., 1985), pp. 1629-1634
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2443314
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Colonization and Establishment of Missouri Prairie Plants on Artificial Soil Disturbances. II. Detecting Small-Scale Plant-to-Plant Interactions and Separating Disturbance from Resource Provision
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Abstract

We investigated whether seedlings and shoots interacted with one another while colonizing small soil disturbances in a tall-grass prairie in Missouri. Specifically, we tested for density dependence of longevity and whether seedlings responded to the creation of a disturbance and/or the provision of an uncolonized resource. There was little evidence of density-dependent mortality among either seedlings or vegetative shoots. There were essentially no differences in either colonization or mortality of seedlings between disturbances with a new, competition-free resource and disturbances without a new resource. Excluding vegetative invaders from a site by means of a polyvinylchloride pipe did not prompt a greater number of seedlings to arise or survive. These results substantiated a noninteractive portrayal of colonization. Individuals of seedlings and shoots appeared and disappeared in a fashion largely independent of one another.

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