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Journal Article

Initiation and Development of Inflorescence and Flower in Anemopsis californica (Saururaceae)

Shirley C. Tucker
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Jan., 1985), pp. 20-31
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2443565
Page Count: 12

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Topics: Stamens, Bracts, Inflorescences, Carpels, Flowers, Ovaries, Apical meristems, Botany, Plants, Meristems
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Initiation and Development of Inflorescence and Flower in Anemopsis californica (Saururaceae)
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Abstract

All flowers of Anemopsis californica, the most specialized taxon of the family Saururaceae, are initiated as individual primordia subtended by previously initiated bracts, in contrast to the common-primordium initiation of all flowers of Saururus cernuus and of most flowers of Houttuynia cordata. Floral symmetry is bilateral and zygomorphic, and the sequence of initiation among floral parts is paired or whorled. In A. californica, the six stamens arise as three common primordia, each of which later bifurcates to form a pair. The three common primordia occupy sites corresponding to the positions of the three stamens in H. cordata flowers. In Anemopsis, the filaments of each pair are connate. Each stamen pair is vascularized by a single bifurcating vascular bundle. The three carpels per flower are usually initiated simultaneously although there may be some variation. Adnation between stamens and carpels results from zonal growth. Downward extension of the locule, and proliferation and expansion of receptacular tissue and inflorescence cortical tissue around the locule below the bases of the carpels produce the inferior ovary. The inflorescence terminates its activity as a flattened apical residuum, surrounded by bracts subtending reduced flowers most of which have stamens only.

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