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A Contribution to the Population Biology of Oenothera grandiflora L'Her

Erich Steiner and Wilfried Stubbe
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 71, No. 9 (Oct., 1984), pp. 1293-1301
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2443654
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Contribution to the Population Biology of Oenothera grandiflora L'Her
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Abstract

The cytogenetic characteristics of samples from 12 populations of Oe. grandiflora L'Her. were investigated. The combination of characters which distinguishes Oe. grandiflora from its sympatric relative, Oe. biennis, includes deeply scalloped margins of the rosette leaf bases, red flecks on the young leaves, clear green stem tips with erect or semi-erect hairs, and clusters of lateral branches at the tip of the central shoot or primary basal branches. In general, flowering is in response to short days and occurs from early August until late October. The species, originally believed to be indigenous to southern Alabama, is found throughout the Southeast, but its presettlement distribution remains uncertain. Populations of Oe. grandiflora consist largely of structural homozygotes or forms showing small circles of chromosomes at meiosis, although one plant with a circle of ten and two pairs was observed. Five different chromosomal end arrangements have been identified; none of these differ, however, by more than two interchanges. The arrangement considered ancestral for the subsection Euoenothera is found in nine of the populations. The species is composed of both self-incompatible as well as self-compatible forms. Incompatibility alleles have been found in 7 of the 12 populations analyzed.

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