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Reexamination of Pore Water Sulfide Concentrations and Redox Potentials Near the Aerial Roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans

Karen L. McKee, Irving A. Mendelssohn and Mark W. Hester
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 75, No. 9 (Sep., 1988), pp. 1352-1359
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2444458
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reexamination of Pore Water Sulfide Concentrations and Redox Potentials Near the Aerial Roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans
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Abstract

Soil redox potentials and pore water sulfide concentrations on a mangrove island in the Belizean barrier reef system were significantly correlated with the presence of the aerial roots of mangrove trees. Sulfide concentrations were three to five times lower near the prop roots of Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) and the pneumatophores of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) than in adjacent (≤1 meter away) unvegetated sediment. Soil redox potentials were also significantly higher near the aerial roots. A comparison of the two species revealed that sulfide concentrations in the rhizosphere of R mangle were as low as that of A germinans However, sulfide concentrations in areas occupied by the black mangrove were variable and a function of pneumatophore density. The occurrence of an oxidized rhizosphere around the roots of both species suggests that the adult trees are equally capable of exploiting reduced sediments as long as their respective pathways for root aeration are functional.

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