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Organization of Genetic Diversity Within and Among Populations of Gleditsia triacanthos (Leguminosae)

Andrew Schnabel and J. L. Hamrick
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 77, No. 8 (Aug., 1990), pp. 1060-1069
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2444577
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Organization of Genetic Diversity Within and Among Populations of Gleditsia triacanthos (Leguminosae)
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Abstract

This study describes levels of allozyme diversity and patterns of genetic structure within and among populations of honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos L.). Using data from starch gel electrophoresis, honey locust was found to have high genetic diversity within populations (H̄E = 0.198), and low, but significant genetic differentiation among populations (ḠST = 0.059). Temporal and spatial substructuring were also investigated in two populations from eastern Kansas. Few genetic differences were found among nine age classes in one population and between juveniles and adults in the second population. Separate autocorrelation analyses of juveniles and adults revealed significant spatial substructuring in both age classes. Three conclusions were reached from these analyses. First, even small amounts of clonal growth can cause large increases in the amount of substructuring in populations. Second, spatial genetic substructuring among juveniles at both sites most likely represents the presence of family groups. Last, the overall level of spatial genetic substructuring at both sites was somewhat greater in the juvenile classes than in the nonclonal adult classes. This latter conclusion is consistent with theoretical studies suggesting that limited gene movement causes a steady increase in spatial structure from generation to generation.

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