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Allozyme Variation in Old World Races of Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae)

Clifford W. Morden, John F. Doebley and Keith F. Schertz
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 76, No. 2 (Feb., 1989), pp. 247-255
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2444667
Page Count: 9
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Allozyme Variation in Old World Races of Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae)
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Abstract

A survey of allozyme variation in cultivated races of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) was undertaken. Eight plants each of 83 accessions representing the five primary races and five of the intermediate races of sorghum were analyzed for 15 enzyme systems encoded by 27 loci. Low levels of variation were found within accessions, which is typical of self-pollinating species. Little variation was also found among accessions. Compared with other cereals, S. bicolor is depauperate in allozyme variation. We found an average of 1.81 alleles per locus with a mean expected heterozygosity of 0.008 for the accessions and total panmictic heterozygosity of 0.093. Only 9% of the variation present was found within accessions, while 91% was among accessions. Most of the variation present is attributable to differences in geographic origin of the accessions rather than racial differences. Western and eastern Africa have the highest levels of total heterozygosity (0.108 and 0.088, respectively), while southern Africa has the lowest (0.008). Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation among races and geographic regions with the accessions failing to segregate into discrete racial or geographic clusters.

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