Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Recolonization of Small Disturbance Patches in a New England Salt Marsh

Jean Marie Hartman
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 75, No. 11 (Nov., 1988), pp. 1625-1631
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2444678
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Recolonization of Small Disturbance Patches in a New England Salt Marsh
Preview not available

Abstract

Availability of colonizers and edaphic conditions were tested in relation to rates of recolonization of open patches in salt marsh vegetation. The density of buried viable seeds was estimated by counting seedlings in undisturbed vegetation and germinating seeds in the laboratory. A low density of viable seeds (<50 per m2) found in these salt marsh soils indicated the absence of an important viable seed bank in this system. Rates of recolonization in natural open patches were monitored for three years. Vegetative expansion of Spartina alterniflora, at approximately 12 cm per year, accounted for most of the recolonization of open patches, although some colonization of annual Salicornia spp. occurred from seeds. Salinity and sulfide and ammonium concentrations were measured in pore water samples from depths of 2-7 cm and 10-15 cm of soil. Comparison of the concentrations from disturbed and undisturbed plots in the marsh did not show significant differences, indicating that none of the edaphic conditions measured would be more inhibitory to plant growth in the disturbed than the undisturbed plots. Therefore, the rate at which small open patches become recolonized is primarily controlled by proximity of Spartina alterniflora and its capacity for vegetative expansion.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1625
    1625
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1626
    1626
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1627
    1627
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1628
    1628
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1629
    1629
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1630
    1630
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1631
    1631