Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Ecology of Elevational Positions in Plants: Drought Resistance in Five Montane Pine Species in Southeastern Arizona

Andrew M. Barton and James A. Teeri
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 80, No. 1 (Jan., 1993), pp. 15-25
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2445115
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Ecology of Elevational Positions in Plants: Drought Resistance in Five Montane Pine Species in Southeastern Arizona
Preview not available

Abstract

We subjected seedlings of five pine species from the Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona to drought in the greenhouse to assess the relationships among elevational position, drought resistance, and biomass allocation. In comparison with upper elevation species, lower elevation species survived longer and experienced less depression of photosynthesis in response to the imposed drought. During the last week of the 29-d drought, internal water potential decreased little in lower elevation species but dropped precipitously in upper elevation species. Thus, relative drought resistance and elevational position of these pines seem associated with the ability of seedlings to survive drought by maintaining favorable plant water potential. Lower elevation and more drought-resistant species allocated less biomass to roots than did other species, a fact suggesting, contrary to assumptions of recent plant community models, that biomass allocation was unimportant in species differences in drought resistance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25