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Spontaneous Hybridization Between Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus) and Weedy B. campestris (Brassicaceae): A Risk of Growing Genetically Modified Oilseed Rape

Rikke B. Jorgensen and Bente Andersen
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 81, No. 12 (Dec., 1994), pp. 1620-1626
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2445340
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spontaneous Hybridization Between Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus) and Weedy B. campestris (Brassicaceae): A Risk of Growing Genetically Modified Oilseed Rape
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Abstract

Frequencies of spontaneous hybridization between oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and weedy Brassica campestris ssp. campestris L. were measured in agricultural fields. Hybrids were identified by enzyme electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, chromosome counting, morphology, and pollen fertility. When the two species were mixed 1:1, B. campestris produced 13% hybrid seeds and oilseed rape 9%. In two experiments with single plants of the selfincompatible B. campestris widely spaced within fields of oilseed rape, 56% and 93% hybrid seeds were produced. Analysis of a weedy population of B. campestris in oilseed rape revealed 60% hybrid seeds. Backcrossing of the hybrids to the weedy species seems to occur as supported by the finding in a natural population of two B. campestris-like plants with a marker specific to oilseed rape. The results suggest that transgenes could be dispersed from oilseed rape to B. campestris.

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