Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Resin-Casting: A Method for Investigating Apoplastic Spaces

James D. Mauseth and Tomoyuki Fujii
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 81, No. 1 (Jan., 1994), pp. 104-110
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2445569
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Resin-Casting: A Method for Investigating Apoplastic Spaces
Preview not available

Abstract

Ibervillea lindheimeri is a dioecious member of the Cucurbitaceae whose male flowers possess a number of sex-specific characteristics including eglandular trichomes on the anther connective. A 2-year study (1989 and 1990) was undertaken to assess the potential for sexual selection of anther trichome number as a male floral trait that enhances pollen removal (a male fitness component). Correlation analysis of ten reproductive and floral traits showed that only the mean number of anther trichomes per flower was significantly associated with mean pollen removal per flower. Anther trichomes are two-celled, consisting of a small, caplike, apical cell and a large, bulbous basal cell. The basal cell is under tension and produces a sticky polysaccharide that is forcefully ejected upward when the apical cell is broken off by visiting bees. The sticky polysaccharide accumulates on the bees and aids in adherence of pollen. We propose that there is directional selection on individual males for number of anther trichomes per flower. The more anther trichomes per flower, the more pollen exported, and the greater the likelihood of siring seeds. Males differed significantly in mean number of anther trichomes per flower and were relatively consistent in their rank order over a 2-year period; both are prerequisites for sexual selection to operate. Selection coefficients and differentials for 1989 and 1990 were 0.005 and 0.007, and 0.22 and 0.32, respectively, and suggest moderate to strong directional selection on anther trichome number.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110