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History of the Botanical Teaching Laboratory in the United States

Emanuel D. Rudolph
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 83, No. 5 (May, 1996), pp. 661-671
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2445926
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
History of the Botanical Teaching Laboratory in the United States
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Abstract

The establishment of teaching laboratories for botany in the United States was strongly influenced in the early part of the 19th century by the founding of a laboratory of natural history at the Rensselaer School by Amos Eaton who inspired numerous educators, particularly women By midcentury and later, botany programs were established at land-grant colleges and the so-called "new Botany" movement spread from them In the latter part of the century additional changes were brought about by the influence of German laboratory activity and botanists' reactions to the introduction of the Huxley-Martin biology programs to America During these times, Americans were improving their own manufactured microscopes, laboratory supplies, and equipment capabilities By the beginning of the 20th century, laboratory teaching of botanical subjects was widely accepted as normal in universities and colleges, as well as in some high schools

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