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Origins of the New Allopolyploid Species Senecio cambrensis (Asteraceae) and its Relationship to the Canary Islands Endemic Senecio teneriffae

Andrew J. Lowe and Richard J. Abbott
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 83, No. 10 (Oct., 1996), pp. 1365-1372
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2446125
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Origins of the New Allopolyploid Species Senecio cambrensis (Asteraceae) and its Relationship to the Canary Islands Endemic Senecio teneriffae
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Abstract

The distribution of a 330 bp cpDNA insertion was reexamined in British material of Senecio cambrensis (2n = 6x = 60), its two putative parental taxa, S. squalidus (2n = 2x = 20) and S vulgaris (2n = 4x = 40), and the closely related Canary Islands' endemic S teneriffae (2n = 6x = 60) This formed part of a test of the hypothesis that the Welsh form of S. cambrensis is derived from introduced S. teneriffae rather than having originated in Wales via allopolyploidy as previously supposed It was established that the 330 bp insertion was carried by all plants of Welsh S. cambrensis and also S teneriffae, but was absent from the cpDNA of Edinburgh S. cambrensis and all plants of British S squalidus and S vulgaris var. vulgaris surveyed However, two of 19 individuals tested of S vulgaris var hibernicus also possessed the cpDNA insertion, indicating that it is present in British material of S vulgaris, although at low frequency. The close similarity between S teneriffae and S cambrensis, especially the Welsh form of S. cambrensis, was confirmed by the results of a restriction analysis of rDNA, and also morphometric and crossing studies However, isozyme analysis showed that S. teneriffae is monomorphic for βEST-3 and ACO-1 phenotypes that are not present in Welsh and Edinburgh S cambrensis, nor in S squalidus and S vulgaris material surveyed. It is concluded that S teneriffae and S. cambrensis are two closely related allohexaploid taxa that have very similar, but different origins. It is postulated that whereas S. cambrensis (in Wales and Edinburgh) is the allohexaploid of S vulgaris and S squalidus, S. teneriffae is possibly the allohexaploid of S vulgaris and S glaucus, the latter being a diploid species closely related to S squalidus

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