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The Okra Leaf Shape Mutation in Cotton is Active in all Cell Layers of the Leaf

Liam Dolan and R. Scott Poethig
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 85, No. 3 (Mar., 1998), pp. 322-327
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2446323
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Okra Leaf Shape Mutation in Cotton is Active in all Cell Layers of the Leaf
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Abstract

Okra (L2 o) is a semidominant mutation of cotton (Gossypium barbadense) that alters leaf shape by increasing the length of lobes and decreasing lamina expansion. Chimeras containing L2 o and wild-type tissue were generated using Semigamy (Se), a mutation that blocks syngamy during fertilization and produces haploid maternal/paternal chimeral progeny at low frequency. In sectorial chimeras, changes in leaf morphology coincide with the boundary between mutant and wild-type tissues, suggesting that L2 o does not regulate a laterally diffusible factor within the leaf. However, in mericlinal or periclinal chimeras, the presence of L2 o in tissue derived from any of the three histogenic layers (L1, L2, or L3) of the shoot apical meristem produced leaves with a partial mutant phenotype The presence of L2 o in the epidermis (an L1 derivative), or in the subepidermal mesophyll of the leaf (L2 derivatives) reduced the growth of the lamina and thus increased the depth of leaf lobes. The presence of L2 o in the middle mesophyll of the lamina and the vasculature of major lateral veins (L3 derivatives) had no local effect on the expansion of the lamina, but significantly increased lobe length. These results demonstrate that L2 o is active in every tissue layer of the leaf.

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