Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Patterns of Genetic Variation Detected by RAPDs Suggest a Single Origin with Subsequent Mutations and Long-Distance Dispersal in the Apomictic Fern Dryopteris remota (Dryopteridaceae)

Jakob Schneller, Rolf Holderegger, Felix Gugerli, Kurt Eichenberger and Eva Lutz
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 85, No. 7 (Jul., 1998), pp. 1038-1042
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2446372
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns of Genetic Variation Detected by RAPDs Suggest a Single Origin with Subsequent Mutations and Long-Distance Dispersal in the Apomictic Fern Dryopteris remota (Dryopteridaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Debates on speciation processes in pteridophytes have revived. In order to study the evolutionary origin of an apomictic fern species, we investigated the genetic variation in the strictly agamosporous Dryopteris remota. We determined the genotypes of 22 individuals from many different locations within the species' European distribution and of 20 individuals from a Swiss population. A previous study on isozyme variation showed no intraspecific genetic variation in a similar sample set (Schneller and Holderegger, 1994, American Fern Journal 84: 94-98). In contrast to this, four out of 12 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers tested revealed low genetic diversity among individuals of D. remora from different locations. Intrapopulational genetic variation was also very low, but in the single population studied, a unique multiband genotype could be detected. The geographic distribution of genetic variation found in D. remora was best explained by the assumption of a single origin, the accumulation of somatic mutations during spread, and occasional, but effective, events of dispersal over large distances. The present study thus stresses the importance of long-distance dispersal in evolutionary processes and biogeography of ferns.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1038
    1038
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1039
    1039
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1040
    1040
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1041
    1041
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1042
    1042