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The Effects of Seed Size, Cotyledon Reserves, and Herbivory on Seedling Survival and Growth in Quercus rugosa and Q. laurina (Fagaceae)

Consuelo Bonfil
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 85, No. 1 (Jan., 1998), pp. 79-87
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2446557
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effects of Seed Size, Cotyledon Reserves, and Herbivory on Seedling Survival and Growth in Quercus rugosa and Q. laurina (Fagaceae)
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Abstract

In a greenhouse experiment, seedling survival of two oak species (Quercus rugosa and Q. laurina) was greatly affected by the excision of cotyledons 1 mo after germination, with a greater impact on Q laurina. The effect of seed size was also significant for both species, with a positive correlation between seed mass and survival and growth. The effect of cotyledon excision on seedling growth persisted throughout the first growing season in Q. rugosa and was not analyzed for Q. laurina due to the low number of seedlings that survived cotyledon excision. Seed size significantly affected seedling height, diameter, leaf area, and biomass at 6 mo. Seed size and cotyledon retention affected the ability of Q. rugosa to recover from herbivory, as both factors had a significant effect on relative growth rates after aerial biomass removal The results show that seedlings originating from large seeds can better endure loss of cotyledons and aerial biomass and thus are better equipped to confront stress early in their lives.

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