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Brain Drain: The Indian Situation

V M Dandekar
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 2, No. 33/35, SPECIAL NUMBER (August 1967), pp. 1573, 1575-1577, 1579, 1581-1583, 1585-1588
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24477865
Page Count: 12
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Brain Drain: The Indian Situation
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Abstract

The disease that has gone deep down and which underlies the entire phenomenon of Brain Drain is, it is argued here, the class and income structure for the intellectuals which we have inherited from British rule. This structure has two characteristic features. First, it places a high premium, both in terms of status and income on the professions vis-a-vis the rest of the society. Second, it has created inordinate inequalities, again in terms of status and income, within the intellectual ranks. The class and income structure for intellectuals has had two consequences. It has resulted in the intellectual class alienating themselves totally from the rest of the society; leaving the country is only one step further in the intellectuals' alienation and does not cause them great pain. And it has lead to anything but an intellectual life within the intellectual ranks, which have been infiltrated by wrong persons with wrong aptitudes and wrong motivations. The remedy must begin where the disease is located. The high premium placed on university education and degrees must be reduced and the inequality within the intellectual ranks must be narrowed down. Once these are accepted, inevitably the country's borders will have to be closed and physical contact with developed countries regulated. But though the doors have to be closed to protect ourselves from the lure of high living abroad and thus from being robbed of our talented persons, the windows will remain open through which all knowledge may enter freely and selected young men may go abroad for specific job training and return home. In other words, we have to be more selective, discriminating and purposeful in our contacts with the developed countries.

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