Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

On Prospective: Development and a Political Culture of Time

Souleymane Bachir Diagne
Africa Development / Afrique et Développement
Vol. 29, No. 1, Special issue on "Philosophy and Development" (2004), pp. 55-69
Published by: CODESRIA
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24482719
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper interprets the African development crisis as a crisis of initiative. Right after the Lagos Plan of Action was adopted in 1980, came in 1981 the Berg Report on which were built the Structural Adjustment Programmes that African countries were soon forced to adopt. Unsurprisingly, the weakened states and impoverished populations lost sight of what was the driving force behind the Lagos Plan of Action; that is, a long-term perspective, a horizon for development. Along with developmental perspective, what was thus lost was nothing less than meaning. This crisis of meaning is felt today particularly in Africa's youngest generations who perceive themselves as futureless unless they emigrate. Because meaning flows from the future to the present, and is about shaping the future, this is a philosophical reflection on time which is also a call for the reconstruction of meaning through the cultivation of 'a prospective capacity' in our African societies. Analyzing this philosophical concept as it was developed by Gaston Berger, this paper argues that such a cultivation of 'prospective' amounts to fostering a political culture of time which is to be understood in total contrast with the ethnological approach attached to a socalled 'African' notion of time. Cet article voit dans la crise du développement en Afrique une crise de l'initiative. Après que les pays africains eurent adopté, en 1980, le Plan de Lagos, le Rapport Be rg a été publié quelques mois plus tard, avec pour conséquence les différents Programmes d'Ajustement Structurels auxquels, bientôt, les pays durent se soumettre. Ainsi des États affaiblis et des populations paupérisées perdirent de vue ce qui faisait la force du Plan de Lagos: une perspective à long terme, un horizon pour le développement. Ce qui s'est ainsi perdu alors, en même temps que la perspective du développement, c'était, tout simplement, le sens. Cette crise du sens est aujourd'hui particulièrement sensible au sein de la jeunesse africaine qui se voit privée de tout autre futur que celui offert par l'émigration. Parce que le sens vient se projeter sur le présent depuis le futur, parce qu'il est dans la création du futur, on appelle ici, dans une réflexion philosophique sur le temps, à une reconstruction du sens par le développement, dans nos sociétés africaines, de la 'capacité prospective'. L'analyse de ce concept philosophique mis en chantier par Gaston Berger conduit à dire que cultiver la 'prospective' n'a rien à voir avec l'approche ethnologique si attentive à ce qu'elle appelle une conception africaine du temps.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[55]
    [55]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69