Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Cuba para todos: Anarchist Internationalism and the Cultural Politics of Cuban Independence, 1898–1925

KIRWIN SHAFFER
Cuban Studies
Vol. 31 (2000), pp. 45-75
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24486167
Page Count: 31
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cuba para todos: Anarchist Internationalism and the Cultural Politics of Cuban Independence, 1898–1925
Preview not available

Abstract

Drawing on anarchist newspapers, novels, and short stories, this chapter examines how anarchists supported Cuba's war for independence in the 1890s and then incorporated symbols, images, and stories of the war into their popular culture after 1898. Anarchists did not interpret the war as a "nationalist" struggle, but as a legitimate struggle against imperialism and patriotic nationalism. Following independence, anarchists attacked the U.S. presence on the island and the Cuban elite who uttered patriotic nationalist slogans while profiting from the emergence of foreign capital. In their cultural productions such as newspaper columns and fiction, anarchists utilized images of the war and of José Martí to promote their imagined ideal of Cuba and cubanidad. Rather than seeing this use of Cuban symbols as "nationalistic," anarchists saw the symbols as reflective of a cultural "nationality" devoid of state connections. In this sense, utilizing these Cuban cultural symbols was a way to highlight the abandonment of the Revolution's goals, point out the hypocrisy of the Cuban elite who proclaimed themselves the heirs of Martí's legacy, and construct an internationalist understanding of Cuban independence. Utilizando periódicos, novelas y cuentos anarquistas, este capítulo examina cómo los anarquistas apoyaron la guerra de independencia cubana durante los 1890 y cómo incorporaron los símbolos, imágenes y cuentos de la guerra a su cultura popular después de 1898. Los anarquistas no interpretaban la guerra como una lucha "nacionalista" sino como una lucha legítima contra el imperialismo y el nacionalismo patriótico. Después de la independencia, los anarquistas atacaron la presencia estadounidense en la isla y a las élites cubanas que gritaban lemas nacionalistas patrióticos mientras que se beneficiaban del creciente capital extranjero. En sus producciones culturales como columnas periodísticas y ficción, los anarquistas utilizaban imágenes de la guerra y de José Martí para fomentar su ideal imaginado de Cuba y de cubanidad. En vez de interpretar este uso de los símbolos cubanos como ejemplos de "nacionalismo", los anarquistas los veían como símbolos que reflejaban una "nacionalidad" cultural sin vínculos con el estado. En este sentido, el uso de estos símbolos culturales cubanos era una manera de ilustrar el abandono de las metas de la Revolución, sugerir la hipocresía de la élite cubana que se proclamaba heredera del legado martiano y construir un entendimiento internacionalista de la independencia cubana.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75