Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Southeast Asia: Comparatist Errors and the Construction of a Region

Ananda Rajah
Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science
Vol. 27, No. 1, Special Focus: Reconceptualizing Southeast Asia (1999), pp. 41-53
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24492979
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Southeast Asia: Comparatist Errors and the Construction of a Region
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper questions the utility of traditional depictions of Southeast Asia as a region in terms of cultural criteria. These depictions, are essentialized characterizations and to the extent that they are directed at identifying Southeast Asia as a region, they reflect comparatist errors. It is argued that the central issue is not how Southeast Asia can or cannot be depicted as a region but, rather, conceptualizing regions and regionness as human constructs. Such an approach requires a focus on interactions instead of identity. From this perspective, regions may be seen as interpenetrated systems, both in a global sense and in sub-regional terms. Interpenetration is seen in terms of interactions of varying intensity and density centering on structures of interest which may be competitive or complementary and where the role of brokers and broker institutions are pivotal. Accordingly, from a long-term human historical perspective, endogenous experiences of region and regionness may well be regarded as variable phenomena depending on the structures of interest and the part played by brokers and broker institutions in any given historical period.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[41]
    [41]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53