Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Verteilungspolitik und Maximin: Gerhard Weisser und John Rawls' „Theorie der Gerechtigkeit“

Christian Müller
Sozialer Fortschritt
Vol. 54, No. 3 (2005), pp. 47-53
Published by: Duncker & Humblot GmbH
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24513104
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Verteilungspolitik und Maximin: Gerhard Weisser und John Rawls' „Theorie der Gerechtigkeit“
Preview not available

Abstract

In diesem Beitrag wird argumentiert, dass der deutsche Ökonom Gerhard Weisser mit seinem Ansatz der Verteilungspolitik alle zentralen Elemente von John Rawls' Maximin-Theorie der Gerechtigkeit - mehr als ein Jahrzehnt, bevor „Eine Theorie der Gerechtigkeit“ zum ersten Mal erschien - vorwegnahm. Als Gegenstand der Verteilung entwickelte Weisser ein Konzept der „Lebenslagen“, das im Wesentlichen Rawls' Konzeption der Grundgüter entspricht. Überdies schlug er eine Maximin-Konzeption der sozialen Gerechtigkeit vor. Um sein Maximin-Prinzip der Gerechtigkeit zu legitimieren, wendete Weisser sogar die Theorie des hypothetischen Gesellschaftsvertrags an unter Verwendung eines Rollentauschs, wie ihn auch Rawls' berühmter „Schleier des Nichwissens“ impliziert. Infolgedessen wäre es ebenso angemessen, den Maximin-Ansatz der Sozialpolitik – statt als „Rawlsian justice“ – als „Weisserian justice“ zu bezeichnen. In this article it is argued that with his approach to distribution policy the German economist Gerhard Weisser anticipated all central elements of John Rawls's maximin theory of justice more than a decade before „A Theory of Justice“ was first published. As the object of distribution Weisser developed a notion of „live situations“ which essentially corresponds to Rawls's conception of primary goods. Moreover, he proposed a maximin conception of social justice. As a means of legitimating his maximin principle of justice Weisser even applied hypothetical social contract theory using a role change device quite similar to that implied by Rawls's famous „veil of ignorance“. As a consequence, it would be as appropriate to label the maximin approach to social politics „Weisserian justice“ rather than „Rawlsian justice“.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[47]
    [47]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53