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Après les assassinats de Fortuyn et de Van Gogh : le modèle d'intégration hollandais en déroute?

Rinus Penninx and Rachel Bouyssou
Critique internationale
No. 33 (OCTOBRE-DÉCEMBRE 2006), pp. 9-26
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24564640
Page Count: 18
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Abstract

The Netherlands used to have an international reputation of a tolerant country and within Europe a guide country for progressive integration policies for newcomers. The political landslide victory of the party of Pim Fortuyn and his assassination in 2002, and the subsequent murder of Theo van Gogh in 2004 seem to have radically altered that traditional image. This article analyses the background of these changes: tracing them back to the Ethnic Minorities Policy established and implemented in the de-politicised context of the 1980s. It then outlines the gradual changes towards more 'Republican' integration policies in the 1990s and finally describes the extreme politicization of immigration and integration policies since 2000. Dutch society's obsession, at least in the public debate and political and policymaking choices at the national level, has had such far reaching negative effects that counterforces, particularly at the local level and in civil society, will likely be able to turn the tide towards more balance in the near future.

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