Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

La démobilisation collective au Cameroun : entre régime postautoritaire et militantisme extraverti

Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle
Critique internationale
No. 40 (JUILLET-SEPTEMBRE 2008), pp. 73-94
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24564988
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

There is no denying that collective mobilization in Cameroon around the political and economic problems in the country, presided by the same chief of state, Paul Biya, since 1982, is very weak. A "post-authoritarian" regime and the strong political extroversion largely explain the dearth of social movements. The successive triumphs of the single party and its intimacy with the state apparatus have led to the domination of a power wielded by instilling fear. This negative assessment of power struggles between the authorities and any mobilized actors is coupled with a low level of autonomy in selecting and formulating causes to defend. The extroversion of collective action in fact leads to importing causes that are not specific to Cameroon. But appropriation of these causes in political or symbolic terms is prohibited in the post-authoritarian space: The restriction of political time to the here and now and the monopolization of political utterance constitute obstalces that are difficult to overcome to formulate common causes. Lastly, the state's obstruction of external collective actors prevents those who have mobilized from getting involved in public action. Furthermore, they must compete with international actors implicated in political reforms without challenging power relations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[73]
    [73]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94