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Translation as a Conceptual Act

Peter Ghosh
Max Weber Studies
Vol. 2, No. 1 (November 2001), pp. 59-63
Published by: Max Weber Studies
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24579582
Page Count: 5
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Translation as a Conceptual Act
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Abstract

Differing translations will have different priorities when translating a theoretical author such as Weber. But the case is made here for translation along historically pure lines, or in accordance with Weber's own views: that means placing a principal emphasis on the accurate translation of concepts, both on the page and via commentary off it. If we do not translate in this way, then any engagement with a Weberian text may be theoretically fruitful, but it will not be an engagement with Weber himself. Good history can be a basis for good theory, unless we believe that the only bad theorist is a dead one.

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