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Journal Article

Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Video Modeling, Video Prompting, and Video Modeling on Task Completion by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

Linda C. Mechling, Kevin M. Ayres, Kathryn J. Bryant and Ashley L. Foster
Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Vol. 49, No. 4 (December 2014), pp. 491-504
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24582346
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Video Modeling, Video Prompting, and Video Modeling on Task Completion by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability
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Abstract

This study compared the effects of three procedures (video prompting: VP, video modeling: VM, and continuous video modeling: CVM) on task completion by three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. The comparison was made across three sets of fundamentally different tasks (putting away household items in clusters of two items; multi-step cleaning tasks whereby each step in the task was completed one time; and multi-component folding tasks whereby steps were performed repetitively). The study combined a multiple probe across behaviors design with an adapted alternating treatments design replicated across three participants. Overall, VP was more effective across the three students for 6 of the 9 tasks, followed by CVM (2 of 9 tasks), and VM (1 of 9 tasks). These data further suggest that the type of task and student characteristics may influence the effectiveness of the three video procedures.

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