Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Tree Species Diversity in the Eastern Deciduous Forest with Particular Reference to North Central Florida

Carl D. Monk
The American Naturalist
Vol. 101, No. 918 (Mar. - Apr., 1967), pp. 173-187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2459448
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Tree Species Diversity in the Eastern Deciduous Forest with Particular Reference to North Central Florida
Preview not available

Abstract

Tree species diversity in forests from north central Florida is partially a function of the successional status of the community, the portion of the environment occupied, and the ecological amplitude of the species. Diversity is higher in climax communities where greater uniformity exists between tree, sapling, and seedling size classes. Mesic fertile sites support communities with higher diversities than wet or dry sterile sites. Successional species tend to have wide ecological amplitudes. They generally occupy extreme environments or areas under disturbance. They are not competitive in mixed populations, and as a consequence they are more successful in assembled populations with low diversities. As successional species ameliorate extreme environments followed by the arrest of controlling variables such as fire, climax pioneer species may invade successional communities thereby increasing diversity. With continued arrest of controlling variables, successional features are lost. The climax pioneer group possess wide ecological amplitudes and are sufficiently competitive in mixed populations to permit their incorporation into the climax community. In fact, it is this group that lends floristic continuity to the climax. A third group, the climax exclusives, invades the community following the acquisition of climax characteristics. The climax exclusives are adapted to specific environmental situations and, consequently, have narrow ecological amplitudes. The noted increase in diversity from successional to climax communities is related in part to the progressive addition of the climax pioneers and climax exclusives while maintaining a few successionals in the population. Diversity within the Eastern Deciduous Forest exhibits two general trends: (1) decrease with increased distance from the Mixed Mesophytic association and (2) decrease with arid and colder climates. The former lends strong support to Dr. Braun's contention that the Mixed Mesophytic association served as the ancestral form from which other members of the Eastern Deciduous Forest arose in whole or in part.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187