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Journal Article

A Comical Reverse. Titian's Doodles in Context

Matthias Wivel
Artibus et Historiae
Vol. 34, No. 68, Papers dedicated to Peter Humfrey: part II (2013), pp. 237-255
Published by: IRSA s.c.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24595691
Page Count: 19

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Topics: Doodles, Drawing, Art museums, Chalk, Portraits, Fresco, Engraving, Mustaches, Stanzas, Idealism
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Abstract

The article examines drawings found on the back of the canvas of the recently surfaced Portrait of a Man (Girolamo Cornaro?) painted by Titian around 1511–1512. Drawn with the point of the brush, they depict a large head in profile and two smaller figures. Loose and broad in execution, at least the former belongs to the domain of caricature. By comparison with similar drawings, on paper as well as the versos of other paintings, the drawings are here attributed to Titian. Further, the possibility that the head might be a portrayal of Michelangelo is explored, as is its value as evidence of the reception of Michelangelo's outsize public stature and self-fashioning as an imperfect, Socratic artist whose work carried palpable overtones of the grotesque. The two figure studies, in themselves acutely Michelangelesque, are related to inventions by other contemporaries. Next, the fact that the caricature wears a beard, but no moustache, occasions an excursus on contemporary facial hair generally and specifically that of Michelangelo's patron, Julius II. Ecclesiastical beards were a controversial issue at the time, and shaving one's upper lip carried liturgical significance. Julius was the first Renaissance pope to grow a beard, as is famously charted by Raphael in his portraits of him in the Vatican frescoes and elsewhere. By focusing on the depiction of his beard, the article sheds new light on the iconography of these pictures and potentially their confused chronology. Lastly, Titian's drawings are examined in the context of contemporary grotesques with reference to Leonardo's explorations of exaggerated physiognomies. On this basis, it proposes a re-evaluation of Renaissance caricature.

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