Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Diversity Relations of Upland Forests in the Western Great Lakes Area

Allan N. Auclair and F. Glenn Goff
The American Naturalist
Vol. 105, No. 946 (Nov. - Dec., 1971), pp. 499-528
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2459749
Page Count: 30
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Diversity Relations of Upland Forests in the Western Great Lakes Area
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Regional, environmental, and temporal gradients of species diversity were examined for upland forests of the western Great Lakes area. Tree, shrub, and herb data for 353 stands were analyzed with emphasis given to community processes regulating diversity levels. 2. The relationship between commonly employed diversity indices was examined. Dominance was shown to be highly related to equitability diversity. Types of diversity other than species-based measures were suggested. 3. A great significance was attached to changes in diversity across time and space. Diversity increased across time in pioneer forests on xeric sites. In successional forests diversity increased through time but decreased in the climax stage. This pattern was interpreted in terms of the capability of terminal species to monopolize environmental requisites. A time-space-diversity model was developed and its implications discussed in relation to recent ecological hypotheses on diversity changes with succession and environmental stress. 4. Pronounced correlations between tree, shrub, and herb diversity depended on inherent structural and dynamic characteristics of forests in different regions. Shrub or herb diversity was least in climax evergreen stands of Tsuga canadensis and greatest in successional deciduous forests. 5. Interregional comparisons of tree diversity indicated that (a) forests on xeric sites were equally low in southern, northern, and boreal transition forests; (b) tree diversity in climax southern and northern forests depended on levels of stand occupancy; and (c) ecological specialization is greatest in the northern forests.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
  • Thumbnail: Page 
528
    528